FAQs About Motorcycle Insurance

Motorcycle insurance is one of the biggest costs involved in riding your motorcycle. Whether your ride is a scooter or a sports bike it’s best to get the best value insurance policy that covers everything you need.

What determines the cost of motorcycle insurance

Your personal details

In the insurance business, age is a common determinant for risk. Male riders under 25 are considered the most likely to file claim, whereas female and older riders are more likely to receive lower premiums. Occupation may also come into play in factoring premiums, depending on whether the coverage compensates you for time missed at work.

Where you live

A big influence on the cost of your car insurance is where you live. The chance of your car being broken into or stolen is a key concern for the insurer. More urban areas traditionally facing greater risk of theft and therefore tend to be more expensive than countryside locations.

The type of bike you own

The type of bike you own can greatly affect your insurance premium. Naturally, a more expensive bike will cost an insurer more to fix or replace. Motorbikes with better engines and faster speeds will represent a greater risk for collision as well as damage caused by an accident.

Older model bikes may require more maintenance and difficulty securing repair parts. For motorbikes older than 20 years, it would be wise to seek an insurer that specialises in classic bikes and cars.

Who else will be riding the bike

Adding another rider to the policy will affect the overall cost. Adding an experienced motorist will generally lower your premium. Conversely, adding a younger individual may escalate costs.

As each insurance company weighs these factors differently, you will find fluctuations in the prices you are quoted. Cheaper rates most likely find your situation more amenable to their particular risk formula.

Usage of the bike

The more often you ride your bike, the more likely you will be involved in an accident. Moreover, bikes that are used for commuting represent a greater risk than those ridden for pleasure, due to the difference in traffic. Residents living in high traffic postcodes may also experience higher insurance costs.

Storage and security measures

Theft represents another concern for insurance companies when calculating premiums. Alarms or anti-theft devices such as an immobiliser, bike lock, or ground anchor can mitigate this risk. In some cases, an insurer might recommend a specific brand or anti-theft device to their consumers.

Parking your bike in a garage can further alleviate theft concerns. Insurance companies will also factor in the crime rate in your postcode before settling on a quote.

Previous claims or convictions

Riders who have made previous claims or suffered motoring convictions present a greater risk to insurers. If you fall into one of these categories, it may be best to seek a company that specialises in insuring convicted riders

Your excess

The excess is the amount of any claim that your insurer will expect you to cover. For example, your riding your bike and you have an accident your bike now needs repairs worth £1000 and your excess is £100, you’ll have to pay £100 and your insurer will pay the remainder.

The more cost you are willing to absorb, the lower your premium. Having a high excess is ideal for riders who travel infrequently or on less busy roads. Those who commute daily may want a lower excess in order to file a claim for minor accidents. This, in turn, will elevate the cost of insurance.

No Claims Discount

Save up your no claims discount by avoiding making small claims upon your policy. After a set number of years, 4 or 5 typically, you’ll often be offered the option to pay an additional small premium to protect your no claims bonus. This can prove very helpful if you subsequently end up having an accident.

Advanced driving skills

By taking an advanced driving course you may also be able to reduce your premiums. The Institute for Advanced Motorists and the Royal Society for Prevention of Accidents each offer membership which provides you with discounts for both the cost of driving courses and your car insurance premiums. Two key variables NOT within the policyholder’s control

Consolidating policies

By insuring a number of vehicles with the same insurer, or by trying to take out home and life insurance through your car insurer, you may be able to secure a ‘bulk buy’ discount.

One final piece of advice

A large percentage of insurance is now sold on the Internet. That’s because it’s convenient and cheap. Many insurers now give a further 10%-15% discount if you buy online.

Level of cover

Third party

This covers the policy holder against damage to a third party’s property or to the third party themselves. Third party only bike insurance cover is usually a cheap motorcycle insurance policy compared to Third Party Fire and Theft or Comprehensive motorcycle insurance.

For example, if you have an accident with another vehicle and it is your fault then the Third Party Only policy will pay for the repair to that other vehicle, and will pay for any medical claims or injuries suffered by the occupant(s) of the other vehicle and your pillion rider. A Third Party Only bike insurance policy will not pay for the costs of repairing your own vehicle nor will it pay anything toward your medical expenses if you are injured. In addition, if your vehicle is stolen or is set on fire, a Third Party Only policy will not make any payment toward the theft or repair of the vehicle.

Third Party Fire & Theft

This is exactly the same as the Third Party Only motorcycle insurance policy, set out above, however a Third Party Fire and Theft UK motorcycle policy will pay out in the event that your vehicle is stolen or is set on fire.

Fully Comprehensive

A Fully comprehensive UK motorcycle insurance policy will pay-out for third party damages and injuries, will pay-out in the event of your vehicle being stolen or set on fire, and will also pay for any damage to your own motorcycle regardless of whose fault the accident was.

Jewelry Making Or Perfume Making – What’s the Difference?

Very recently I've stumbled upon what proves to be another new hobby of mine, making perfumes using natural, essential oils. I've purchased several oils from the UK so far, and started combining them to make perfumes. Which does not seem to be so easy as I first thought. Most of the concoctions smell horrible, at best as a bad medicine.

I've searched a lot the internet for recipes on the subject, but it's hard anything out there. There are a couple of real life workshops that one should attend, at over $ 1000 a piece, and very few books on the subject, mostly touching the history of perfumery and the ingredients, but less the actual blends, mixes. So I broke down and purchased from Mandy Aftel the Level 1 Workbook, at a price of $ 375 (yep, you've read it right!) And shipping to Europe $ 80 (right again!), As this looks pretty much the only feasible avenue for somebody to really learn perfumery without spending a large amount of essential oils on trial and error, by not knowing what is one really doing in the process.

So now I'm waiting for it to arrive …

And in the meanime I'm musing …

Most probably since the time I started with wire wrapping, I did spend about this amount or even more on books and tutorials, however the difference between this workbook and the tutorials for wire wrapping, is that I've bought MANY tutorials, on all aspects of wire wrapping and jewelry making. I've learned a lot of skills in the process. I have now a new level of appreciation for all the wire wrappers who so freely share their knowledge in allowing the rest of us to learn their secrets, and to make their jewelry pieces. Without all these tutorials, and book out there, it would have been much more challenging to learn wire wrapping, even to the level I am right now (which is not that far). It is a completely different world between the two.

Perfumers guard their secrets as if with their lives, they will not share but the very basic of blends, which does not bring one very far, and wire wrappers, or jewelers in general are very generous, and share. Yes, for a price, but the prices are very reasonable, anything between $ 5 and $ 15 for learning how to make one pendant, a pair of earrings, a ring, any items from start up to completion. Plus there are also many free tutorials out there, which allow you to build on your existing knowledge and widen it too. Best example out there is Eni Oken, who has many tutorials for a veeeery reasonable price, but also many freebies to get you started.

The Triumph Thunderbird Motorcycle

While practically everyone on the planet has heard of the Triumph Bonneville, the Triumph Thunderbird motorcycle has not achieved the same amount of fame. And yet, the Thunderbird was at least as important to Triumph as the ‘Bonny’ in terms of sales and popularity .. it simply doesn’t get mentioned as often. Among the Triumph faithful and aficionados though, the Thunderbird is perhaps the most important Triumph to be produced.

It all started with three riders driving across 500 miles at 92 mph on three different – but recorded as stock – Thunderbird 6T motorcycles. In 1949, that was a testament to durability, reliability and speed. From that year until 1966, Triumph produced the Thunderbird motorcycle out of the Meriden factory and shipped them all over the world. All models had a 649c.c. two-cylinder engine – a big increase from the 498c.c. Speed Twin it was modeled after – and was mated to a 4-speed gearbox. It proved to be so well liked – perhaps loved – in the U.S. that, after 1950, Triumph sold more bikes in America than it did in any other country including in the homeland of England.

The Thunderbird motorcycle went away after 1966 only to reappear in 1981 as the Thunderbird TR65. It was simply an ‘economy’ version of the T-140 Bonneville and was only sold in the U.K. and a handful of British Commonwealth countries. It lasted three model years and then Triumph suffered some very tough times.

However, John Bloor brought the company back to full-on production in 1990. Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. of Hinckley began another model run of the Thunderbird motorcycle in 1994. This beauty had an 885c.c. 3-cylinder engine connected to a six-speed transmission and rode on very confidence-inspiring 18 inch front and 16 inch rear wheels. A tractable 69hp and 52ft/lb of torque carried the 485lb dry machine over any distance in any place you could find fuel. It was blessed with classical good looks, two-tone paint and historical emblems and exhaust. Like the first T-bird, it was built for cruising and its parts and accessories catalog was ready to help with anything a rider may need or want.

The Thunderbird 900 Sport motorcycle was produced in 1997. It had many upgraded components – wheels, brakes, suspension, etc. – and put 82hp to the ground – a significant increase. The design was slightly modified as well, but it retained its lovely retro styling. The 900 Sport was the last 885c.c. Thunderbird motorcycle to be made ..

Until the 2010 Thunderbird motorcycle was developed! The latest addition is a rather large twin with 1600c.c. in displacement, a comfortable cockpit, great handling and smooth character. It still lives up to the needs of a cruiser or touring rider, and it is a very exciting and well-balanced ride. The Triumph Thunderbird motorcycle enters a new century and a new icon is born.

Affiliate Marketing Review Articles – How To Make Money

Let’s quickly go over how you can use affiliate marketing review articles to make money. This is a strategy that successful affiliate marketers are using to make a lot of money every month as an affiliate marketer.

1. Buy the affiliate product. This makes sense because how can you write a review if you don’t personally know about the product?

We are not talking about reading a website and then re-writing the sales page. We are talking about using firsthand experience of on an affiliate product that you believe in.

2. Write an honest review. Your readers will believe you more if you include both positives and negatives about the affiliate product you are writing about.

Chances are the negatives will be small in number, but there will be some. You do not want to dwell on these, but you do need to list them.

Your review should provide an objective opinion about what you have found on the affiliate product you are reviewing.

3. Submit your review articles to online article directories. This is where readers will read your review. Search engines can also find these articles in the review sections and use those pages in their search engine results.

4. Add your review to your blog. If you do not have a blog you should set one up.

Then bookmark your blog articles into social directories where search engines and readers can find them as well.

This is a good strategy for making money as an affiliate marketer. Writing affiliate marketing review articles is a proven winning tactic for increasing your sales.